Magic, Spells & Potions
Articles Menu
Magic on Facebook!
Magic Symbols, Divination, Magical Visions - Give me a Genius Symbol! Magic Spells & Potions Welcomes You Visitor!

Pure Energy Magic with StarFields - POWERED BY LOVE.

All spells & rituals here are created with love and safe for beginners.

Buy a magic spell by Starfields

Sloe

Sloe

The term Sloe, or Sla, means not the fruit but the hard trunk, being connected with a verb signifying to slay, or strike, probably because the wood of this tree was used as a flail, and nowadays makes a bludgeon.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,887 Reads More Magic --->

Silverweed

Silverweed

Country folk often call it Cramp Weed: but it is more generally known as Goose Tansy, or Goose Gray, because it is a spurious Tansy, fit only for a goose; or, perhaps, because eaten by geese. Other names for the herb are Silvery Cinquefoil, and Moorgrass. It occurs especially on clay soils, being recognised by its pinnate white silvery leaves, and its conspicuous golden flowers.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,931 Reads More Magic --->

Skullcap

Skullcap

A useful medicinal tincture (H.) is made from the Skullcap (Scutellaria), which is a Labiate plant of frequent growth on the banks of our rivers and ponds, having bright blue flowers, with a tube longer than the calyx.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,780 Reads More Magic --->

Shepherd's Purse

Shepherd's Purse

The small Shepherd's Purse (Bursa Capsella Pastoris) is one of the most common of wayside English weeds. The name Capsella signifies a little box, in allusion to the seed pods. It is a Cruciferous plant, made familiar by the diminutive pouches, or flattened pods at the end of its branching stems.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,989 Reads More Magic --->

Selfheal

Selfheal

Several Herbal Simples go by the name of Selfheal among our wild hedge plants, more especially the Sanicle, the common Prunella, and the Bugle.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,890 Reads More Magic --->

Sea Weed

Sea Weed

Of the more ordinary Sea Weeds (cryptogamous, or flowerless plants) some few are edible, though sparingly nutritious, whilst curative and medicinal virtues are attributed to several others, as Irish Moss, Scotch Dulse, Sea Tang, and the Bladderwrack.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 4,677 Reads More Magic --->

Sea Holly

Sea Holly

The Sea Holly (Eryngium maritimum), or Sea Hulver, is a well-known prickly sea-green plant, growing in the sand on many parts of our coasts, or on stony ground, with stiff leaves, and roots which run to a great length among the sand, whilst charged with a sweetish juice.

A manufactory for making candied roots of the Sea Holly was established at Colchester, by Robert Burton, an apothecary, in the seventeenth century, as they were considered both antiscorbutic, and excellent for health.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,617 Reads More Magic --->

Scurvy Grass

Scurvy Grass

This Scurvy Grass has the botanical name Cochlearia, or, in English, Spoonwort, so named from its leaves resembling in shape the bowl of an old-fashioned spoon. It is supposed to be the famous Herba Britannica of the ancients. Our great navigators have borne unanimous testimony to its never-failing value in scurvy; and it has been justly noticed that the plant grows most plentifully in altitudes where scurvy is specially troublesome and frequent.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 2,111 Reads More Magic --->

Schalot

Schalot

The Schalot, or Eschalotte, is another variety of the onion tribe, which was introduced into England by the Crusaders, who found it growing at Ascalon. And Chives (Allium schoenoprasum) are an ever green perennial herb of the onion tribe, having only a mild, alliaceous flavour. Epicures consider the Schalot to be the best seasoning for beef steaks, either by taking the actual bulb, or by rubbing the plates therewith.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 2,139 Reads More Magic --->

Savin

Savin

Savin, the Juniper Savin (Sabina), or Saffern, was known of old as the "Devil's Tree," and the "Magician's Cypress," because much affected by witches and sorcerers when working their spells.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 2,074 Reads More Magic --->

Samphire

Samphire

Samphire, of the true sort, is a herb difficult to be gathered, because it grows only out of the crevices of lofty perpendicular rocks which cannot be easily scaled. This genuine Samphire (Crithmum maritimum) is a small plant, bearing yellow flowers in circular umbels on the tops of the stalks, which flowers are followed by seeds like those of the Fennel, but larger.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 2,006 Reads More Magic --->

Sage

Sage

A well-known monkish line about it ran to this effect: Cur moriatur homo cui Salvia crescit in horto? "Why should a man die whilst Sage grows in his garden?" And even at this time, in many parts of England, the following piece of advice is carefully adopted every year: "He that would live for aye Must eat Sage in May."

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,921 Reads More Magic --->

Saffron

Saffron

The fabled origin of the Saffron plant ran thus. A certain young man named Crocus went to play at quoits in a field with Mercurie, when the quoit of his companion happened by misfortune to hit him on the head, whereby, before long, he died, to the great sorrow of  his friends. Finally, in the place where he had bled, Saffron was found to be growing: whereupon, the people, seeing the colour of the chine as it stood, adjusted it to come of the blood of Crocus, and therefore they gave it his name.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,630 Reads More Magic --->

Rush

Rush

The true Rushes (Juncaceoe) include the Soft Rush (effusus); the Hard Rush (glaucus); and the Common Rush (conglomeratus). The Bulrush (Pool Rush) is a Sedge; the Club Rush is a Typha; and the flowering Rush, a Butomus.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,501 Reads More Magic --->

Rue

Rue

This herb was further termed of old "Herb of Grace" as well as "Serving men's joy," because of the multiplicity of common ailments which it was warranted to cure. Rue constituted a chief ingredient of the famous antidote of Mithridates to poisons, the formula of which was found by Pompey in the satchel of the conquered King.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,824 Reads More Magic --->

Rosemary

Rosemary

It was usual to burn Rosemary in the chambers of the sick, just as was formerly done with frankincense, which gave the Greeks occasion to call the Rosemary Libanotis. In the French language of flowers this herb represents the power of rekindling lost energy. "The flowers of Rosemary," says an old author, "made up into plates (lozenges), with sugar, and eaten, comfort the heart, and make it merry, quicken the spirits, and make them more lively."

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,740 Reads More Magic --->

Rose

Rose

Certain curative properties are possessed both by the Briar Rose, or wild Dog Rose of our country hedges, and by the cultivated varieties of this queen of flowers in our Roseries. The word Rose means red, from the Greek rodon, connected also with rota, a wheel, which resembles the outline of a Rose.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 2,275 Reads More Magic --->

Rice

Rice

The custom of throwing a shower of Rice after and over a newly married couple is very old, though wheat was at first the chosen grain as an augury of plenty. The bride wore a garland of ears of corn in the time of Henry the Eighth.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,833 Reads More Magic --->

Rhubarb

Rhubarb

Our Garden Rhubarb is a true Dock, and belongs to the "many-kneed," buckwheat order of plants. Its brilliant colouring is due to varying states of its natural pigment (chlorophyll), in combination with oxygen. For culinary purposes the stalk, or petiole of the broad leaf, is used.

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,726 Reads More Magic --->

Raspberry

Raspberry

Raspberry is a cool magical ingredient, giving two important components - the sexy fruit, and the plant itself, which is a tough survivor. Raspberry lends itself to a huge variety of love spells, healing spells and all manner of energy magic potions. 

Posted Dec 1, 2010 1,578 Reads More Magic --->
101-120 of 458
Share The Magic ...
Learn to do proper magic - buy the book!
Best book on Magic - Magic, Spells & Potions by Silvia Hartmann
       
Magic Spells & Potions
               
REAL Magic by StarFields
                             
How to do magic right - available for INSTANT download.
                                       
Buy THE Book on Modern Energy Magic
                               
Click HERE.               

E is for ENERGY!Do you love ENERGY?

Do you love working with energy, playing with energy, talking about energy and discovering more about MODERN energy?

Then join The Guild of Energists today!

THE place to be for MODERN energists.

GoE - We LOVE Energy! 

magic spells copyright starfields copyright symbolAll magic spells, magic articles, text & images by StarFields unless otherwise stated.
All Rights Reserved In All Media.